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Mustang II Front Suspension — Build Your Own for a Fraction of the Cost!

$16.99

Professionally drawn, fully-dimensioned engineering drawings that show every aspect of Mustang II Street Rod Front Suspension construction. The plans with work with stock or dropped spindles, as well as stock or aftermarket control arms. Standard or a wide variety of aftermarket coil springs and shocks can be used. Coil over shocks an be used with aftermarket control arms.

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Description

ford_mustang-II_mach-1_75
Hot Rod history has it that Chuck Lombardo was the first person to use the Mustang II Front Suspension on a street rod back in 1974, shortly after the Mustang II was introduced. Why? As Chassis Engineering’s Eric Aurand noted in Rod & Custom Magazine, “This is the most modern passenger car non-strut tower independent front suspension ever made, because everything built after this design has been either front-wheel drive or a tower-type configuration.”

Originally, the Mustang II IFS became popular with street rodders not only because it was relatively easy to install, compared to a subframe swap, but also because it handles so well and provides better brakes and a rack and pinion steering option as a bonus.

Top 10 Reasons Street Rodders Use

the Mustang II Front Suspension:

    • Great geometry — corners so well it’s used on many Cobra replicars
    • Narrow track width makes it perfect for hot rods and street rods
    • Spindles designed to work with more dependable rack and pinion steering
    • Power rack and pinion steering easily and economically adaptable
    • In other IFS cars, installing the Mustang II will allow you to eliminate bulky shock towers and make room for bigger engines
    • Disc brakes easily mounted
    • Light weight — many drag racers use the Mustang II IFS to knock a lot of weight from the front end of their cars
    • Predictable road manners — lightweight suspension and wheels contribute to better ride quality because there is less momentum behind the wheel travel and the spring can more easily keep the wheels planted on the pavement
    • Easy and economic to repair — aftermarket stock and performance components widely available (Speedway and many others)
    • Easy to update with huge variety of aftermarket parts: tubular control arms, strut rods, coil-over shocks, air suspension, dropped spindles, chrome pieces, etc.
That’s why the Mustang II front suspension is by far today’s most popular independent front end with the Street Rod, Resto-Rod, Hot Rod, Rat Rod and Custom Car community. Mustang II Front Suspension IFS T-Bucket
Heck, the Mustang II IFS is so versatile that you’ll sometimes even see them improving the ride on T-Bucket hot rods.
Mustang II junkyard front suspension
The Mustang II IFS that street rodders love was produced from 1974 to 1978 and can also be found under the 1974-1980 Ford Pinto and Mercury Bobcat. However, the Mustang II Front Suspension has been so sought after by hot rodders and street rod builders over the past 40 years that you’d be very lucky to find one you can scrounge on the cheap from your neighborhood junkyard. The good news is they’re so popular that all the component parts are still widely available in the automotive aftermarket!
Mustang II Front Suspension

Over the years numerous street rod shops produced their own Mustang II IFS kits, made up of the Mustang II aftermarket suspension components and their own fabrications of the critical key structure made up of the crossmember, spring towers and steering rack mounts. The problem is they sell for anywhere from over $1000 to well over $2000 or more — but that’s hard to swing if you’re a street rodder on a budget or a grease-under-the-nails build-it-yourselfer! Heck, you’d even spend close to $500 just for a crossmember do-it-yourself kit!

So, even if you did find a junkyard Mustang II with its front suspension still intact, swapping it into your street rod isn’t just a bolt-on upgrade as it involves welding in a new crossmember, as well as new mounts for the suspension pieces. Now, there’s a true solution for the average street rodder …
How to Build Mustang II IFS Front Suspension Street Rod

Build Your Own Professional Quality Mustang II Front Suspension

– – for a Fraction of the Cost!

Why pay big bucks to some rod shop when you can make your own suspension for a fraction of the cost? The Mustang II Front Suspension we show you how to build in our plans looks and works the same but costs a whole lot less!

    • Materials are inexpensive and readily available.
    • The cost for materials is only a small fraction of what a rod shop kit costs!
    • You can do it yourself with these plans!
    • Assembly is easy and requires no more tools than it would to mount the suspension using one of those expensive chassis shop kits.
    • These detailed, simple plans show you how to take the raw materials and shape them to the correct dimensions the same way the hot rod shops do it.

Our “Build Your Own Mustang II Front Suspension” plans package includes the following:

    • Fourteen (14) big 11×17″ pages showing you how to make all parts, assemble them and then install the finished product successfully on your car.
    • In addition to the drawings listed below you will also receive full installation instructions as well as important information on how to choose which options will work for your car.
    • Plans include 3D views of all parts and assemblies to make fabrication and installation easier than ever. You do not need to know how to read blueprints to use these plans.
    • Application: Universal fit for most Street Rods , trucks, custom cars and drag cars.
    • Options: Fully adjustable ride height. Locate the front wheels where you want them front to back. The plans with work with a stock or dropped spindles, as well as stock or aftermarket control arms. Standard or a wide variety of aftermarket coil springs and shocks can be used. Coil over shocks an be used with aftermarket control arms.
    • The drawing package includes both the plans to build the front end and a second set showing how to install the front end.
    • All drawings are of professional quality developed using the latest in CAD (computer aided design) software. The computer-drawn plans permits the proper geometry to be developed so that the suspension on your build will be the same quality that professional rod shops sell.

In addition to the drawings listed below you also will receive full installation instructions as well as important information on how to choose which options will work for your car.

    • Steering Rack Mounts (2 types)
    • Spring Tower “Set Up Gauge” Plates
    • Crossmember Front and Rear Plates
    • Crossmember Top and Bottom Plates
    • Crossmember Side Plates
    • Crossmember General Assembly
    • Spring Tower Top Plate
    • Spring Tower Spring Ring
    • Spring Tower Cap
    • Spring Tower Wrap
    • Spring Tower General Assembly
    • How to Set Ride Height During Installation
    • How to Install the Crossmember to your Chassis
    • How to Install the Spring Towers
    • How to Install the Strut Rods
    • Alignment for the Best Ride and Handling
    • Frame Modifications for Steering Rack or Spring Clearance (if needed)
You will receive professionally drawn, fully-dimensioned engineering drawings that show every aspect of Mustang II Street Rod Front Suspension construction. The Mustang II Front Suspension Plans drawing package includes: Fourteen (14) big 11×17” pages showing you how make all parts, assemble them and then install the finished Mustang II Front Suspension successfully in your car.

How to Build Mustang II IFS Front Suspension Street Rod

Just click on the “Add to Cart” button and your Mustang II Front Suspension Plans will be sent to you promptly by return mail.

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